STEVE MCNAIR’S CAP IMPACT

Street Talk STEVE MCNAIR’S CAP IMPACT

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OWINGS MILLS — The Baltimore Ravens’ major investment in new quarterback Steve McNair carries a maximum value of $32 million over the course of his five-year contract, according to NFL Players Association documents. However, the three-time Pro Bowl selection’s financial package is actually built to act as a three-year agreement that will pay him a total of $20 million.
 
McNair, 33, is slated to receive an $11 million roster bonus on Sept. 1 of this year in lieu of a formal signing bonus. He will be paid a base salary of $1 million.
 
McNair’s base salaries elevate significantly beginning in 2009 when he’s scheduled to be paid $6 million. He’s due another $6 million in 2010 when his contract concludes.
 
McNair is due a $1 million option bonus next spring. His base salary for 2007 is $3 million and he’s to be paid a $4 million base salary in 2008.
 
McNair’s salary-cap figure for this season is a manageable $3.2 million, much less than the $23.46 million he counted against the Tennessee Titans’ books prior to being traded to Baltimore on Thursday for a fourth-round draft pick in next year’s draft. He still counts over $14 million against the Titans’ salary cap this year, a reduction of $9 million.
 
Because of the prorated portion of McNair’s bonus and his increased base salaries over the next few years, his salary-cap figures will count for $5.45 million in 2007 and $6.45 million in 2008. In 2009 and 2010, McNair’s salary-cap figures would account for $8.45 million each year.

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Aaron Wilson

About Aaron Wilson

Aaron Wilson covers the NFL for National Football Post as well as the Baltimore Ravens for The Carroll County Times and Ravens24x7.com. He has previously covered the Jacksonville Jaguars and Tennessee Titans and has covered the NFL since 1997.  He has won several regional writing awards, including, most recently, Best Sports News Story for the state of Maryland in voting conducted by the Associated Press managing editors.  More from Aaron Wilson

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