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DRAFT PROSPECTS: Wide Receivers Round 2

NFL Draft DRAFT PROSPECTS: Wide Receivers Round 2

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As a part of our coverage here at Russell Street Report, we’ll be featuring the best prospects all across the board in any situation the Ravens might come across. Whether it’s a receiver in the first round, a quarterback in the sixth, or a guard in the third, we’ll cover the Ravens best options in any scenario. Barring any trades, the team will pick in the middle of each round—so we’ll see who is available when the Ravens are projected to select their upcoming stars. This will make it easy for you the fan to look at what the Ravens are seeing in future NFL prospects.

Click Here for Interior O-Line Prospect Analysis

Click here for WR Round 1 Prospects

The first round looks like a prime spot for Ozzie Newsome and his staff to jump and take one of the top receivers in this class. Should they forgo that opportunity and look at the second round for play-making weapons for Joe Flacco, there’s plenty of depth in this class to suffice. Here’s a look at some of the top options for Round Two.

Allen Robinson, Penn State

Here’s the Ravens dream second round selection. Robinson helped Christian Hackenberg navigate through his first season at quarterback with his great receiver play for the Nittany Lions.

Robinson doesn’t possess elite straight-line speed, but he does have the ability to have multiple catches per game and turn them into big yards. Remind you of someone…say Anquan Boldin?

While he isn’t quite at Boldin’s level quite yet, Robinson’s speed and knack for finding holes in the defense is impressive. If he falls to the second round, expect the Ravens to jump.

Jordan Matthews, Vanderbilt

If you like shifty, playmaking receivers—Jordan Matthews is your guy. Standing at 6’3”, Matthews is a monster on the field.

The Vanderbilt alum is a cousin of Jerry Rice. Although he doesn’t have crazy speed, he’s very shifty and can make defenders miss. His route-running needs some fine-tuning, but Matthews uses his whole body well, and his skillset projects to translate smootly to the NFL.

The Ravens would like to have a big-bodied receiver across from Torrey Smith. Matthews may be able to play in the slot with Smith and Marlon Brown on the outside. That’s a combination that should interest the organization.

Jarvis Landry, LSU

Click here for more on Landry

Having a strong college career across from O’Dell Beckham, Landry was able to put up big numbers and turn some heads catching passes from Zach Mettenberger.

Landry isn’t a huge target, but he does enough to keep defenders on their toes with good speed and agility. At times, Landry had some big drops, but had reliable hands for the most part. He is very good in the open field and is an above-average route runner.

Landry should also be a productive NFL wideout. His game appears to be pretty steady and he should make an impact right away. This would be a safe pick for Gary Kubiak’s offensive scheme.

Brandin Cooks, Oregon State

Although he isn’t a big guy like Matthews or Robinson, Cooks has to be the dark-horse candidate in this class.

Standing at just 5’10”, Cooks lacks the size and strength that many in this class have. While he grades out to a first-rounder by some, I see the second round as a fitting landing spot for the former Oregon State pass-catcher.

I’m interested to see what Cooks will be able to do after being in an NFL environment for a while. He has the little things that you look for, but work with NFL coaches and receivers will help him. Torrey Smith would be a great mentor for the young Cooks.

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Joe Wedra

About Joe Wedra

Joe is an NFL enthusiast that spends way too much time studying tape, but he wouldn't want it any other way. Joe can be found on Twitter @JoeWedra, where he'll tweet out everything from Ravens analysis to scouting reports on Division II offensive line prospects...all for the love of the game! More from Joe Wedra

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