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  1. #97

    Re: Alternative Names for the Ravens



    Quote Originally Posted by alien bird View Post
    I'm siding with HoustonRaven on this one. Boston Tea Party, Boston Massacre, Lexington & Concord, The Shot Heard 'Round the World (the original), Paul Revere, etc. . . .

    There is a reason there is a holiday in Massachusetts (and Maine, which was once part of Massachusetts) called Patriots' Day.
    In Baltimore we have "Defender's Day" commemorating those that fought in the Battle of Baltimore Sep 12-14 1812.

    So how bout Baltimore Defenders
    If you break the rules you can't make the rules.
    - Remove Coach Tomlin from the NFL Competition committee.




  2. #98

    Re: Alternative Names for the Ravens

    Ravens was obviously the right choice.

    I think Stars would have been ok it would have been a tip of the hat to the Star Spangled Banner and Fort McHenry...guessing the NFL was worried about the Cowboys objecting?

    Baltimore Knights....could have done something kinda cool with that. Jousting is the state sport lol beats the other choices that NFL gave us IMO
    A linebacker's job is to knock out running backs, to knock out receivers, to chase the football,
    -Ray Lewis




  3. #99

    Re: Alternative Names for the Ravens

    I wish they would have done what we did to Cleveland and had left the name behind with us.

    At least our name isn't the "Baltimore Marylanders."




  4. #100
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    Re: Alternative Names for the Ravens

    Quote Originally Posted by Real Fan Dan View Post

    In Baltimore we have "Defender's Day" commemorating those that fought in the Battle of Baltimore Sep 12-14 1812.

    So how bout Baltimore Defenders
    And don't forget our own Federal Hill which should be close to HRs heart. Originally called John Smith's Hill for the first non-native American to see it, the name was later changed when people walked up to it from Fells Point and other hoods to celebrate Maryland's ratification of the US Constitution.

    It was quite a party too that lasted a while with 1,000 pounds of beef, 500 pounds of ham, 15 1/2 barrels of beer plus 240 gallons hard cider which was a lot in those days, and 9 1/2 gallons of peach brandy and much more. Someone called it Federal Hill and the name stuck. During the Civil War union troops manned the hill with big guns pointed at the city in case the civilians acted up again like the did with they attacked Union troops marching from Union Station to Camden Yards to get on the train to DC. 12 rioters were shot on Pratt street.

    The guns are still on the hill pointing at the city and could shoot as far as 25th Street or further.


    The only patriotism wasn't in NE.

    http://www.federalhillonline.com/history.htm
    Last edited by AirFlacco; 04-01-2013 at 11:09 AM.
    Pic of a natural act: UBER RAVENS FAN AND HISTORIAN GURU. THE PAST IS NOT DEAD, IN FACT, IT IS NOT EVEN PAST.' WILLIAM FAULKNER.




  5. #101

    Re: Alternative Names for the Ravens

    Quote Originally Posted by Mista T View Post
    I've never heard the term Patriots associated with the American Revolutionaries south of New England. Nor have I heard it associated with the War of 1812.
    The Mel Gibson movie "Patriot" is based on American patriots fighting in South Carolina.

    Also, there was an invasion of Florida by Americans in Georgia called the "Patriot War" in 1812-1814. They wanted to take Florida away from Spain at the same time we were at war with Great Britain. It didn't work.
    Last edited by Real Fan Dan; 04-01-2013 at 11:52 AM.
    If you break the rules you can't make the rules.
    - Remove Coach Tomlin from the NFL Competition committee.




  6. #102
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    Houston, TX Y'all
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    21,187

    Re: Alternative Names for the Ravens

    Quote Originally Posted by Real Fan Dan View Post
    The Mel Gibson movie "Patriot" is based on American patriots fighting in South Carolina.

    Also, there was an invasion of Florida by Americans in Georgia called the "Patriot War" in 1812-1814. They wanted to take Florida away from Spain at the same time we were at war with Great Britain. It didn't work.
    Gibson was misapplying the term.

    The word is a french derivative and was adopted by soldiers in the NE. Patriots were, in essence, Massachusetts soldiers. The term would eventually morph into what we know today, but it's history.

    During Revolutionary times, no soldier but a MA soldier would have been called a "Patriot".
    WARNING: This post may contain material offensive to those who lack wit, humor, common sense and/or supporting factual or anecdotal evidence. All statements and assertions contained herein may be subject to literary devices not limited to: irony, metaphor, allusion and dripping sarcasm.




  7. #103

    Re: Alternative Names for the Ravens

    Quote Originally Posted by AirFlacco View Post
    And don't forget our own Federal Hill which should be close to HRs heart. Originally called John Smith's Hill for the first non-native American to see it, the name was later changed when people walked up to it from Fells Point and other hoods to celebrate Maryland's ratification of the US Constitution.

    It was quite a party too that lasted a while with 1,000 pounds of beef, 500 pounds of ham, 15 1/2 barrels of beer plus 240 gallons hard cider which was a lot in those days, and 9 1/2 gallons of peach brandy and much more. Someone called it Federal Hill and the name stuck. During the Civil War union troops manned the hill with big guns pointed at the city in case the civilians acted up again like the did with they attacked Union troops marching from Union Station to Camden Yards to get on the train to DC. 12 rioters were shot on Pratt street.

    The guns are still on the hill pointing at the city and could shoot as far as 25th Street or further.


    The only patriotism wasn't in NE.

    http://www.federalhillonline.com/history.htm
    I thought those cannons they had on Federal Hill were to fire on any ships that got past Ft. McHenry. You learn something new everyday.


    ARE YOU NOT ENTERTAINED?!




  8. #104
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    Re: Alternative Names for the Ravens

    Yea, my dad always said it was named Federal Hill because of that. He was born two blocks to the south of it.

    The first blood shed of the Civil War was on Pratt St in Baltimore, not Ft Sumter. In fact, nobody died when the fort was taken til the next day when a soldier died when some captured ordnance in the fort accidently exploded.

    More people died in Baltimore.

    General Butler the Butcher was Lincoln's Commander then but didn't get the name Butcher til New Orleans where he massacred some people for the same thing in Baltimore. He carried out his threat there and all that was after he surrounded the State HOuse in Annapolis to stop them from voting to leave the union. He even arrested some of the legislatures trying to vote.

    Today there's a big plaque in it's lobby that says they were just trying to get info on leaving. They wern't trying to vote to leave.

    Total Bull Shit!!
    Pic of a natural act: UBER RAVENS FAN AND HISTORIAN GURU. THE PAST IS NOT DEAD, IN FACT, IT IS NOT EVEN PAST.' WILLIAM FAULKNER.




  9. #105
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    Re: Alternative Names for the Ravens

    As I understand it, the Federal Hill cannons were indeed present and used during the War of 1812 vs the British coming into the Harbor.

    The cannons were turned towards the city itself after the battle of the Massachusetts troops marching from President Street Station (just south of President and Pratt, right near the Pier 5 hotel and Della Notte present day) down Pratt Street to Camden Station. In those days, the PRR stopped at President and the troops were moving from the PRR to the B&O to get to Washington.

    They obviously weren't welcomed by the local populace as Maryland was a Southern state (though there were strong sentiments both ways). It just hadn't seceded yet (the book "Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass" gives a good look at pre-Civil War Baltimore)

    Those attacking the soldiers included civilians and, if I remember correctly, members of the Baltimore Police Department, lead by the chief himself.

    Lincoln decided he couldn't have any more of that, nor any part of Maryland seceding and therefore surrounding Washington. So the cannons were turned and they surrounded Annapolis.

    What's interesting is there were both Union and Confederate armies raised from Maryland. Marylanders loyal to the Union marched under the coat of Calvert. Marylanders local to the Confederacy marched under the Crossland banner.

    After the war, the state flag was changed to a combination of both and remains the same to this day. During the Preakness, give a close listen to "Maryland, My Maryland" when it's sung by the Naval Academy glee club.

    ---

    I liked Ravens for the name during the phone poll after the Modell move. For the expansion name, I thought a name related to the railroad would have been good, given that modern railroading was more or less started in Baltimore at Mt Clare Junction.

    Given the other choices, I'm just glad we got a name that has something to do with Baltimore. Unlike other cities, we don't have to play rhetorical games to pretend like the name really fits into something else famous about our city **cough** **cough** Colts and Jazz **cough** **cough**.
    ---

    Baltimore Colts (AAFC): 1947-1950
    Baltimore Colts (NFL): 1953-1984
    Baltimore Stars (USFL): 1985
    Baltimore Colts/Stallions (CFL): 1994-1995
    Baltimore Ravens (NFL): 1996-Present




  10. #106
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    Re: Alternative Names for the Ravens

    LOL - Just like Irsay snuck out of town in the middle of the night and a snow storm, Butler the Butcher snuck into town at night and under the cover of a thunderstoom to build an armed fort on Federal Hill. He was scared to death of those rioters. I'm sure my relatives were in there because my grandfather who was born in 1888 on Wilkens Ave had uncles who fought for the south. My bet is they were amongst the rioters too which is probably where I get my penchant for "stirring the pot" as Mista T always says.

    Here's a pic of a gun pointing at the city and that looks like a Civil War era gun, not War of 1812.

    http://www.panoramio.com/photo/82373878

    Same type cannon here only a little shorter.


    http://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=...QEwCA&dur=3631
    Last edited by AirFlacco; 04-01-2013 at 05:21 PM.
    Pic of a natural act: UBER RAVENS FAN AND HISTORIAN GURU. THE PAST IS NOT DEAD, IN FACT, IT IS NOT EVEN PAST.' WILLIAM FAULKNER.




  11. #107
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    Re: Alternative Names for the Ravens

    If Mista T had listened to his wife and done more reading than watching HBO he would have known that southerners were Patriots. Here's a link, ancestry.com, showing the records of the patriots from South Carolina that fought in the Revolutionary War. Also Col Morgan marched a detachment from Virginia to Cambridge to fight just two years after Bunker Hill. They were patriots too.

    The army was called many things mainly The Continental Army, the Patriots, the Minutemen, the Rebels and even the Yankees with the last two being insults from the British. Yankee comes from the Dutch word yak which means redneck or hill billiy or slime. That's what the Dutch called the British when they drove them out of New York and latere allied themselves with the Patriots.

    Gibson's movie was correct in breaking down the two groups in South Carolina as loyalists and patriots. The loyalists did massacre their patriot neighbors in the back woods.

    _________________________________
    A recent compilation of Patriot records, including militia records, is Bobby Gilmer Moss, comp., Roster of South Carolina Patriots in the American Revolution (1983; reprint, Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1994). See also Alexander S. Salley, Jr., comp., South Carolina Provincial Troops in Papers of the First Council of Safety, 1775 (1900–02; reprint, Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1999).
    __________________________________

    And no one would deny Thomas Jefferson as a Patriot or James Madison not to
    mention George Washington - all from Virginia. This link certainly doesn't.

    http://www.studyzone.org/testprep/ss5/b/revleadl.cfm



    It's so much easier to watch HBO and text.





    http://www.ancestry.com/wiki/index.p...litary_Records
    Last edited by AirFlacco; 04-02-2013 at 12:31 AM.
    Pic of a natural act: UBER RAVENS FAN AND HISTORIAN GURU. THE PAST IS NOT DEAD, IN FACT, IT IS NOT EVEN PAST.' WILLIAM FAULKNER.




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