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  1. #1

    Stigma of suicide



    Feel free to tell me to get lost. I joined this site for the football and have less then 20 posts in politics forum in 3 years with the rest of my 1,700 plus posts on football.
    But I have an interest in current affairs and like to learn where I can.

    Air Flacco tells me Maryland is a Catholic State which from my experience means bottling up what you feel and never ever asking for help!

    Was recently discussed in Ireland that suicide among young men is a bigger killer then road traffic accidents.
    I'd like to ask if it's the same this side of the pond?

    If this thread dies or I get negative responses that's cool, I'll leave it be and stick to the football.
    But it is an issue among men and here we are, a football board.

    Is it a Maryland issue?
    There was a brief discussion about Junior Seau last summer but that was an age ago
    And there were a few posts which called him selfish which I can get why people say that but I would never say that myself

    Mods, feel free to slap me down and lock if needs be

    As for this side of the pond? Asking for help is a sign of weakness! Pull yourself together and sort yourself out and then we wonder why the rate is so large.....
    Any wonder why people turn to drink!

    Do Marylanders ever talk about this?




  2. #2

    Re: Stigma of suicide

    I haven't seen statistics for the past year, but while it's not as big a killer in the US as some other things, tens of thousands commit suicide in the US each year. In 2009 it was the 10th leading cause of death, 7th for males and 16h for females.

    In Maryland it's not as high as other parts of the country, but I don't know what the percentage is to population.




  3. #3
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    And I'd hardly call Maryland a Catholic state anymore.

    But I suppose that's for another thread.
    WARNING: This post may contain material offensive to those who lack wit, humor, common sense and/or supporting factual or anecdotal evidence. All statements and assertions contained herein may be subject to literary devices not limited to: irony, metaphor, allusion and dripping sarcasm.




  4. #4
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    This issues is indicative of a larger issue -- mental health.

    Yes, I'd say there's still a stigma in the states as a whole over mental health issues, particularly the aspect of asking for help being a sign of weakness. Which is silly in my book. If I have a pain that's debilitating, I go see a doctor. But for some reason, if that pain is emotional, a large segment of the population expects you to deal with it on your own.

    I don't think Seau is a good example though. Repeated concussions with no time for proper healing has been linked to depression and suicide. Tragic as his situation is, I don't think this is a function of garden variety depression and suicide.
    WARNING: This post may contain material offensive to those who lack wit, humor, common sense and/or supporting factual or anecdotal evidence. All statements and assertions contained herein may be subject to literary devices not limited to: irony, metaphor, allusion and dripping sarcasm.




  5. #5
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    Re: Stigma of suicide

    Not sure about the suicide rates for Maryland. But the US military suicide rates are incredibly high. More Soliders, Sailors, Airmen, and Marines have died as a result of suicide over the past decade then anything else. Yes, including the 2 wars fought. Last summer the military was averaging one suicide per day!

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/0...n_1578821.html
    "I got this." - Justin Tucker




  6. #6
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    I have a friend who is an officer in the Armed Services. I'm going to be very vague about who he is and which branch in respect to his privacy.

    He suffers from depression and night terrors pretty regularly. Flash backs, and anxiety as well. But because he's both active duty,,and has a rather sensitive position with regards to classified materials, he is afraid to seek help professionally. He told me that if it went on his record that he needed anxiety medication or sleeping pills, his career would be in legitimate jeopardy.

    He and his wife ended up going to marriage counseling on her insurance in an attempt to get him in a room with a shrink without putting a black mark on his jacket, and that helped. It's marriage counseling in name only, it's really his therapist, and his wife usually just waits in a side room. But unfortunately he can't accept any medication so it doesn't really do much.

    The entire thing blows my mind. Clearly there's an epidemic of mental health concerns in the US Armed Forces, but how many servicemen are forced to ignore their problems, or take half measures, do to the military's ass backward stance on it? They started making servicemen sign anti-suicide oaths as if that's any sort of solution.

    It's a bitter joke.
    My motto was always to keep swinging. Whether I was in a slump or feeling badly or having trouble off the field, the only thing to do was keep swinging. -Hank Aaron




  7. #7
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    Re: Stigma of suicide

    Quote Originally Posted by ActualSpamBot View Post
    I have a friend who is an officer in the Armed Services. I'm going to be very vague about who he is and which branch in respect to his privacy.

    He suffers from depression and night terrors pretty regularly. Flash backs, and anxiety as well. But because he's both active duty,,and has a rather sensitive position with regards to classified materials, he is afraid to seek help professionally. He told me that if it went on his record that he needed anxiety medication or sleeping pills, his career would be in legitimate jeopardy.

    He and his wife ended up going to marriage counseling on her insurance in an attempt to get him in a room with a shrink without putting a black mark on his jacket, and that helped. It's marriage counseling in name only, it's really his therapist, and his wife usually just waits in a side room. But unfortunately he can't accept any medication so it doesn't really do much.

    The entire thing blows my mind. Clearly there's an epidemic of mental health concerns in the US Armed Forces, but how many servicemen are forced to ignore their problems, or take half measures, do to the military's ass backward stance on it? They started making servicemen sign anti-suicide oaths as if that's any sort of solution.

    It's a bitter joke.
    I totally understand what your friend is going through, as I myself am in a senistive position with access to classified information. He's right, having any mental related marks on your record is a career killer. In the Air Force the office is called Mental Health (they had to change the name to Life Skills because of the stigma attached).

    They preach understanding...but when it comes time to reinvestigate your Top Secret, you will lose your clearance. Seen it happen many times.

    It sucks. But your friend is doing what he can. I encourage him to continue to use all "uncharted" avenues. Also look at over the counter drugs...(if he's not PRP status, he'll know what that means) or alternative/herbal medicines.

    The military talks out both sides of its mouth when it comes to suicide. They could do a hell of a better job at getting people the help they need....and without the stigma and potential job loss.
    "I got this." - Justin Tucker




  8. #8
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    Re: Stigma of suicide

    I book-ended both gulf wars, enlisting right after the first gulf war and getting out in August of 2001.

    I was an MP I recall vividly some of the MP's who were coming back from the first gulf war. They were clearly not the same and that war, by comparison, was next to nothing compared to the multi-front war that's winding down now.

    Sadly, it's not confined to the military, though it's more prevalent there. Even in today's society, it's still a sign of weakness and it almost guarantees you becoming a second class citizen, even for the slightest of disorders.
    WARNING: This post may contain material offensive to those who lack wit, humor, common sense and/or supporting factual or anecdotal evidence. All statements and assertions contained herein may be subject to literary devices not limited to: irony, metaphor, allusion and dripping sarcasm.




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