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  1. #49

    Re: the NFL in London



    Quote Originally Posted by 4G63 View Post
    Would season ticket holders be opposed to getting a credit of some sort from the Ravens/NFL were they to lose a home game at M&T?
    I don't understand your question ... The NFL already does provide a credit to the "home" team: no charge for the deleted true home game. Plus the privilege of being able to buy replacements seats at Wembley (which, however, cannot be resold, so screw the brokers).

    I am a lot more bothered by having to pay for two sham exhibition games than missing one true home game (which I would likely not miss anyway). That is why I favor the 17-game or 18-game season and halving the exhibitions. I would also like to see the NFL rotate all the imitation exhibitions out to neutral sites, which was the practice in the NFL's early years, or, if not, price these fraudulent games at 1/2 price or remove the mandatory purchase. London games are merely a sideshow compared to the exhibition rip-off, in my opinion.

    In a 2003 BBC poll that asked Brits to name the "Greatest American Ever", Mr. T came in fourth, behind ML King (3rd), Abe Lincoln (2nd) and Homer Simpson (1st).




  2. #50
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    Re: the NFL in London

    My family has PSLs...can't say I'd be thrilled if we had a "home" game there....as sometime said, we have one of the best HFAs in the NFL. Also, I prob couldn't afford to just up and take a trip London! But that's just me

    Sent from my DROID RAZR using Tapatalk 2




  3. #51
    Quote Originally Posted by GOTA View Post
    Rotating home venues makes it even tougher to win. The Packers used to have to play some home games in Green Bay and some home games in Milwaukee. They had almost 20 years with just 1 winning season. Finally they were able to play all their home games in Green Bay which helped a lot. Home field means a lot in the NFL. I can't see a team having any sort of home field advantage if they don't have 1 home. They're almost better off establishing 2 teams if they need that kind of exposure.
    Actually, the Packers played in Milwaukee for 40 years, starting in 1953, including their glory years.




  4. #52
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    Re: the NFL in London

    Quote Originally Posted by Ravens75 View Post
    The Ravens enjoy an incredible HFA that arguably only bettered by Seattle. If the Ravens were to miss out on the playoffs because they lost a 'home' game played at a neutral site it would not be taken well.
    Well thats the thing; the Ravens/Bisciotti can argue they shouldn't lose their home game based on ticket sales alone but as we all know the NFL could give two shits what the Ravens want since we had to play an away game on Thursday night in Denver.

    Quote Originally Posted by Mista T View Post
    I don't understand your question ... The NFL already does provide a credit to the "home" team: no charge for the deleted true home game. Plus the privilege of being able to buy replacements seats at Wembley (which, however, cannot be resold, so screw the brokers).
    I'm saying the Ravens could give season ticket holders deep discounts on merchandise or something similar. Like I said above, the Ravens have a case against losing their home game based on their home sellout crowds. If the NFL decides to screw the Ravens again then the NFL should work out some kind of financial plan with the Ravens' for the lost revenue by offering Ravens fans something besides first dibs on tickets at Wembley.




  5. #53

    Re: the NFL in London

    Quote Originally Posted by Captain Silver View Post
    Speaking as someone who visits the U.K. at least once a year and most of my co-workers are in Edinburgh, the interest in American football is just that. A fanciful distraction.
    I don't visit the British Isles that often, but most Brits I have met seem to consider the NFL to be more than merely a "fanciful distraction". Today's crowd of 1/2 million had to impress owners of some teams that have problems with fan support, such as Oakland, Jax, and San Diego:


    More than half a million people were drawn to the NFL Block Party on Saturday afternoon, as Regent Street, in London's busiest shopping district, was closed down for the day to play home to football fans celebrating before Sunday's game between the Pittsburgh Steelers and the Minnesota Vikings.NFL fans wearing every one of the 32 team jerseys (yes, I counted them myself) were out in force, enjoying a string of delights put on by the NFL and eating American-themed food.

    The main attraction, though, was a stage upon which appeared a host of big-name talent from the Steelers and Vikings, including both teams' head coaches, likely future Hall of Famers in Ben Roethlisberger and Troy Polamalu of the Steelers, and Vikings stars Adrian Peterson and Jared Allen.

    All of the players and coaches who appeared on stage exited stunned by the level of support, as fans from across the world turned out to see them and cheer them on before the game.
    At the time the NFLPA agreement was being negotiated, Goodell enticed the players' cooperation with boasts of tripling NFL revenues to over $20 billion within 10 years. At that time I predicted that this could only be achieved by four types of expansion: 18 game season, add more teams, more playoffs, and geographic expansion into Europe's TV market (larger than ours). "That's my story and I'm stickin' to it!"
    In a 2003 BBC poll that asked Brits to name the "Greatest American Ever", Mr. T came in fourth, behind ML King (3rd), Abe Lincoln (2nd) and Homer Simpson (1st).




  6. #54
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    Re: the NFL in London

    Quote Originally Posted by Mista T View Post
    I don't visit the British Isles that often, but most Brits I have met seem to consider the NFL to be more than merely a "fanciful distraction". Today's crowd of 1/2 million had to impress owners of some teams that have problems with fan support, such as Oakland, Jax, and San Diego.
    I'd like to see the details. I have a funny feeling that everything in Regent Street was heavily subsidized by the NFL just so they could make this sort of cockamamie claim. You could get 500,000 Brits damn near anywhere in a New York nanosecond by passing out free food.
    At the time the NFLPA agreement was being negotiated, Goodell enticed the players' cooperation with boasts of tripling NFL revenues to over $20 billion within 10 years. At that time I predicted that this could only be achieved by four types of expansion: 18 game season, add more teams, more playoffs, and geographic expansion into Europe's TV market (larger than ours). "That's my story and I'm stickin' to it!"
    You left out the most likely (& most impactful) way to increase revenues: Add new viewers in the Western Hemisphere (women & Hispanics) for whose eyeballs you can charge in the TV contracts. "Breast cancer awareness month" (pink cleats & gloves), "Hispanic awareness month" (& Telemundo simulcasts en espanol), & a major amount of the progressive "pussification" of play (for demographics that historically abhor on-field violence) is aimed at enticing these two underserved (or should we say under-suckered-in) groups to the audience that can be sold to the networks.

    IMO they've already topped out with both demographics--the more players taken off on carts (as the league errs on the side of caution), the more it will underscore the essentially violent nature of the sport & repel both groups, and Hispanics are pretty good at knowing when they're being pandered to (it doesn't help when the poster boy for the Latino NFLer is under indictment for murder). But that won't keep them from continuing to chuck that particular ficken....




  7. #55

    Re: the NFL in London

    Quote Originally Posted by Toddyvegas View Post
    And cricket will always remain ingrained as our summer sport.. Its like baseball is to you guys as a nation. Football (sorry guys I can't stand the name soccer) and cricket along with rugby our our national sports.. Its the fourth sport that NFL can realistically vie for but it will never take over those three I am afraid.. However,the yk is a sports mad country and NFL is growing.. I work in an office of around 20 people and 3 discuss NFL.. So there is a percentage that are genuinely interested.. A UK team would bring more interest especially if it was anywhere near successful..
    I'm not convinced by that. Football, yes, it'll be difficult to out compete that - but that's the same for a huge amount of the globe.

    Cricket/rugby could be fair game for the long haul, though. Both sets of those fans like it for things that overlap with NFL (yes, even cricket - a lot of it is based on strategy and can be quite stop-start. If you can sit through a day's play where it's back and forth on the field because of weather, where overs take five minutes because the captain keeps messing with the field placings and a scoring play may be once every 3 overs - I think you can enjoy even a 9-6 turgid play, flag fest of a game). Cricket also has serious issues to overcome to even keep going in the long run (which is saddening, really). It may not yield talent for the game, but it may in some small quantity for viewership.

    Rugby's more difficult, sure, but the simple fact is the NFL has something that rugby doesn't - money. To a top rugby star, where a transition to the NFL is not too far away providing groundwork has been done beforehand, what would you prefer? The highest paying player in rugby is on a salary of just over a million per year. Even a scrub special teamer can get that in the NFL. To get that money, you'll have to move to France these days - US or France? The more Brit players you get, particularly if successful - or from any country you wish to grow a fanbase in - the bigger the following will be. There was more than a bat of an eyelid over the Okoye/Watson moves to the league.

    There isn't much of a link between universities and professional sports has had been stated. That gives the league a golden opportunity if it wishes to move to that direction as well - as was stated before, invest time into the grassroots will yield the dividends later if the league and/or teams do it correctly.




  8. #56

    Re: the NFL in London

    Well, I am sure of one thing, this London game is going to suck ass.
    "When questioned, the Elders explained that they were in search of magical powers. However, they're actually searching for the whereabouts of a certain ring. This ring is a legendary treasure that long ago was known to exist"




  9. #57
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    Re: the NFL in London

    Quote Originally Posted by The Excellector View Post
    Well, I am sure of one thing, this London game is going to suck ass.
    You are probably right.....roflmao




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