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  1. #1

    Marc Trestman knows his crap



    http://www.chicagotribune.com/sports...,7332934.story

    Did you wonder why Chicago Bears coach Marc Trestman did not call a timeout during the Baltimore Ravens' drive at the end of regulation in an attempt to save time for his offense in case the game was tied or they trailed?

    So did we. Trestman kept all three time outs in his pocket, and the Bears went to overtime in Sunday's 23-20 victory. Trestman's shared his thought process about the decision during a 1-minute, 54-second explanation Monday afternoon. Here is the full transcript:

    "When you call timeouts at the end of halves, you want to call them in succession if you can. If you’re calling them just hit or miss, there’s really no value in them. So just a little bit of history: When you start a drive from the 16-yard line, you have a 13 percent chance, probably, over the last five years to score a touchdown. And you have to take that into consideration when you go into the game. And then when a team’s driving, you’ve got to know what they have, and you’ve got to know what you have. They had two timeouts at the time, and we have three timeouts.

    Well, the normal thinking is you never want to leave the game with your three timeouts. You want to get them back, especially in those situations. But the fact of the matter is there was really no time to use the timeouts. And when you’re in a two-minute situation, if you use your timeouts, and there’s no way you can call them in succession, you give them more time on each and every play to get the people out there they want to get that play done. So you have to consider that.

    So really only the first time where I considered really calling a timeout was after Ray Rice had the 11-yard run to the 5-yard line. And he took that ball, probably, I think it was about at 1:16 when he had that ball. That was the first time. I was down there with the official. That was the first time. But when you put ... the numbers all together, if you call three timeouts right there in succession, you’re still only getting the ball back at 18 seconds, OK? If you let it run, they’re in a two-minute mode, OK? And now they’ve got to call two timeouts, so a couple things come into the play with their using their two timeouts.

    No. 1, they didn’t call a timeout on the first one, which means they had to call a play out of their two-minute package instead of using their red-zone package. So that’s No. 1. They didn’t call a timeout and get into different personnel groupings to call the play. And then by using their two timeouts, we knew what they had to do on third down. They had to throw it because there wasn’t enough time left to do anything else. So we cut the percentages in half from run to pass. And then there was just one big leap of faith. But if we call three timeouts in a row, we’ve got 19, 18 seconds left at the max. So the percentage of them scoring — it’s a leap of faith. I mean, they went all the way down the field. Three points, yes. Tie the game. Seven points, we’re talking 13 percent.

    "And then from an offensive standpoint, as a play-caller, I know if you call timeout, you can get what you want out there. If not, you’ve got a limited bag of plays you can use. So that’s the reasoning behind it. I would have loved to have been able to have a situation when they were running the ball and they started to get in that field goal area where we could have plugged the timeouts each one on top of each other, but it wasn’t the case."
    Particularly interesting:

    They didn’t call a timeout and get into different personnel groupings to call the play. And then by using their two timeouts, we knew what they had to do on third down. They had to throw it because there wasn’t enough time left to do anything else. So we cut the percentages in half from run to pass.
    1) We should have had a third timeout if it weren't for that horrible challenge and 2) we should have passed on 2nd down to leave both options on the table for 3rd down





  2. #2

    Re: Marc Trestman knows his crap

    I'm an alcoholic




  3. #3

    Re: Marc Trestman knows his crap

    I thought it was dumb at the time but his logic is pretty sound. Learn something new every day.




  4. #4
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    Re: Marc Trestman knows his crap

    I'm so jealous. I wish we had bright, innovative coaches like that. Maybe we do, but they're on leashes of Harbaugh's arrested development as a coach.




  5. #5

    Re: Marc Trestman knows his crap

    That's a solid argument, but the one thing which he has wrong if they did use their timeouts when Ray got to the 5, the percentages say that the clock would more than likely not get run down to zero. The Ravens would more than likely have scored or had an incomplete pass in one of the three plays goal to go plays. The only way for there to be 18 seconds on the clock would be for the Ravens to run three plays that do not get into the endzone and do not result in a single complete pass. Meaning the Ravens would have had to run the ball 3 times without getting in, or they would complete a pass (or passes) short of the endzone. Both logics have their upside, but obviously his philosophy worked out, so congrats (even though it shouldn't have but that's a whole nother story.)




  6. #6

    Re: Marc Trestman knows his crap

    "And then from an offensive standpoint, as a play-caller, I know..."

    What is a statement that we should never expect to hear from John Harbaugh, at least not in the foreseeable future, Alex?




  7. #7

    Re: Marc Trestman knows his crap

    Looking back at it, Harbaugh might have been better served to call the timeout immediately following the first down, for organizational/ and situational purposes.
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  8. #8

    Re: Marc Trestman knows his crap

    It was brilliant because it worked. If the Ravens stay competent on offense for just one more play and score a TD in the last 30 seconds... or God forbid the final play with 7 seconds left... Trestman is a massive, massive idiot.

    The second down run on film is just brutal. Yanda pulls and they leave a big hole in the middle that somebody (forget who) shoots through. Shipley gets blown back. Clark tries to block, but also gets pushed back in to Rice, just as Rice tries to bounce it left. Monroe releases to hit someone at the second level (though he never touches anybody on the play). If Shipley just holds his ground and Dickson is in instead of Clark, Rice might have been able to get in off LT.

    The Monroe aspect of that play is astounding to me. You're in a mudpit, two yards from the goal line with a chance to flat out win the game. You're running the ball. How on earth do you just flat out NOT TOUCH ANYONE as an offensive lineman in that situation? And the Bears weren't worried about a pass... they were playing man on the three wides and basically stacking the box. If you're determined to run regardless, bring Dickson and Leach in to the game and take out Clark and Thompson.
    Last edited by Ravens2006; 11-19-2013 at 06:59 AM.




  9. #9

    Re: Marc Trestman knows his crap

    Quote Originally Posted by Ravens2006 View Post
    The Monroe aspect of that play is astounding to me. You're in a mudpit, two yards from the goal line with a chance to flat out win the game. You're running the ball. How on earth do you just flat out NOT TOUCH ANYONE as an offensive lineman in that situation?
    I am not impressed with Monroe so far. Gino had a great game however.


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  10. #10

    Re: Marc Trestman knows his crap

    His strategy worked so it's easy to look back and call him a genius. But, if the Ravens would've been able to get a touchdown there and the Bears lose, then it's guaranteed that Trestman is ripped big time by the Chicago media and fans.

    With that said, I do always wonder why a defense needs to call a TO in that situation. His logic makes sense...not allowing the Offense to sub out personnel groupings to get what they want for that scenario. Better to make the Offense work with what they have. Harbaugh/Caldwell/Flacco need to realize that they only have 2 TO's and should not call a running play on 2nd down which leaves them with more options on 3rd down and will keep the defense guessing.




  11. #11
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    Re: Marc Trestman knows his crap

    I think we all knew they were going to throw on 3rd down
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  12. #12
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    Re: Marc Trestman knows his crap

    If there was 1:16 left after the first down by Rice, the Ravens had plenty of time to run the goalline group on to the field. They didn't run their next play (which was the draw to Rice that went to the 2) till there were 36 seconds left and called the timeout with 23 seconds left. Had they hustled to the line and run that same draw play to Rice with, say, 50 seconds instead, they could have called a TO at 45 seconds, put the goalline group out there, with one TO and at least one shot to ram it in with that personnel had they wanted to try it.

    Looking back on it, I can't believe that somehow 40 seconds ran off there after the first down with no play being run, and no change in personnel? Is that right? I mean, I watched the game and all, but I didn't realize there was such a huge gap of time between those plays. They had time to call whatever play they wanted, and put in whatever group they wanted.

    Apparently they liked 3 wides better than goal line down there? The only pass play we have out of that that ever works is the little flip over the middle that Boldin kept hitting in the playoffs and that Torrey is starting to hit. But other than that, we have no other reliable pass plays down there. Sometimes the little 2 yarder in the flat to Leach, but that's really all we have.
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