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  1. #1

    Andrew Brandt's Analysis of the "Peyton Predicament"



    Part 1
    Part 2
    Part 3

    Plenty of good insights and details on the contract for those who are interested.
    Last edited by Kyle Cactus; 02-09-2012 at 10:56 AM.




  2. #2
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    Re: Andrew Brandt's Analysis of the "Peyton Predicament"

    Thanks. Interesting stuff. Especially the part about Irsay wanting Manning to retire.
    He Who Dares.....Wins




  3. #3
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    Re: Andrew Brandt's Analysis of the "Peyton Predicament"

    Given the changes that they've gone through, his health uncertainty, and the $ involved, there is no doubt in my mind that Manning has taken his last snap under center. Look for him in a booth on CBS next year.

    He's got millions, two twin newborns, and a neck that could cause permanent damage with the wrong hit. Can't take away from his legacy but he's done IMO.
    World Domination 3 Points at a Time!




  4. #4

    Re: Andrew Brandt's Analysis of the "Peyton Predicament"

    I think he's definitely done in Indy. I think he'll probably try and sign with another team though, but there certainly are some good reasons for him to hang it up.




  5. #5

    Re: Andrew Brandt's Analysis of the "Peyton Predicament"

    If he is done as a player, as I predicted LAST year. Expect him to go into coaching not the booth, either Qb coach or OC. He's to competitive to not be actively envolved.




  6. #6

    Re: Andrew Brandt's Analysis of the "Peyton Predicament"

    Considering the comments yesterday by Peyton and today by Irsay, it does suggest that Peyton is going to leave the Colts.

    It's probably the right move for the franchise. The question will be whether Peyton plays, and if so, who for?

    For his sake - and the sanity of the fans and the media - I hope he doesn't end up like another Favre.

    I'd imagine he'd only want to risk it all for another title (he's already loaded beyond imagining and that doesn't seem his motive), but which team is really just a QB step up as well as having the cap room (unless he leaves millions on the table)?

    It'd leave only the Niners and Jets and both of them are a step behind the top teams. He's more likely to get a ring via coaching staff. The booth won't get him that. If he did retire, the scramble to get him into coaching could be frantic - if the Colts annoyed him too much for him to return there, there's going to be a fair few franchises bidding for his services.




  7. #7

    Re: Andrew Brandt's Analysis of the "Peyton Predicament"

    Brandt just added part 3. I've attached a link in the OP.

    For those interested in the minutia of salary cap numbers, there's a very interesting example in this article of a potential use of the signing bonus.

    In short, the $28 million roster bonus is due on March 8th. Then new league year doesn't start until March 13th, so the cap hit from the option bonus was prorated against the 2011 cap along with the signing bonus. If the option isn't exercised, the $5.6 million that was prorated against the 2011 cap would be credited back to the 2012 cap, reducing the 2012 dead money from $16 million to $10.4 million.




  8. #8
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    Re: Andrew Brandt's Analysis of the "Peyton Predicament"

    http://sports.yahoo.com/nfl/news?slug=ycn-10945020

    writer describes Peyton as having a 'noodle arm'.
    not good. hard to rehab after 30.
    Baltimore Ravens, 2012 NFL Champions!




  9. #9

    Re: Andrew Brandt's Analysis of the "Peyton Predicament"

    Peyton's noodle arm is a direct consequence of damage down to the particular nerve that controls the triceps in his throwing arm. ...

    While the fusion itself has healed in his neck, the nerve apparently has yet to regenerate. That's not a surprise, as nerves themselves can take several months to heal (and sometimes they never heal). The real issue all along with Manning's recovery was not whether his neck would heal (that was a given); it was whether or not his nerve innervating the triceps muscle would heal enough to give him back the arm strength that's required of an NFL quarterback.
    If this issue hasn't gone away by now, there's a good chance it will still be around in March. Any team that signs him early in free agency is likely taking a huge risk.




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